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Press Mentions

Alabama Community Colleges Sign Reverse Transfer Agreement

Alabama Today, Nov. 10, 2016

Officials of the Alabama Community College System and public universities across the state announced a new agreement that will allow students to transfer credits from four-year institutions back to a two-year institution in order to complete a degree.

“Many people understand that you can take courses at community colleges, transfer those credits to a university, and apply them toward a four-year degree,” said Jimmy Baker, acting chancellor of the Alabama Community College System. “Our new agreement makes it possible for students to transfer credits in the other direction, too, helping them to attain a recognized credential they can use in the workplace or as they further their education.” Read more>

 

New company hopes to increase number of community college transfers by offering a marketplace for students

Inside Higher Ed, Nov. 8, 2016

A new public benefit corporation is hoping to ease the transfer process for community college students and drive four-year institutions to compete for these students. The Affordable College Public Benefit Corporation is a network, marketplace and app that helps students transfer from community colleges with more credits to the university that fits their career and degree goals.

While most community college students interested in transfer are place bound, nearly one in five students who started at a two-year institution transfer across state lines, according to the National Student Clearinghouse. Read more>

Don’t neglect the value of the second-chance student

Chief Learning Officer, Nov. 7, 2016

The booming market of nontraditional and continuing education is filled with many people who are now working toward degrees because they got sidetracked earlier in their studies. According to the National Student Clearinghouse, in 2012, nearly 40 percent of all postsecondary students were adult learners, 25 years of age or older. That age range likely hasn’t changed much. From my experience helping institutions of higher education, many of these adult learners, or non-traditional students, likely didn’t succeed in their first try at college and have come back to try again. Read more>

 

4-year colleges should admit more community college students

Community College Daily, Nov. 3, 2016

While 80 percent of community college students say they plan to transfer to a four-year school, most never do. The National Student Clearinghouse Research Center reported last year that only 15.1 percent of students who began community college in 2009 graduated from a four-year college within six years. More must be done to give community college students pathways to the bachelor’s degrees they want and are supremely capable of earning. Read more>

Reverse Transfer – A Commitment to Student Success

Kalamazoo Valley Community College, Nov. 3, 2016

According to recent data from the National Student Clearinghouse, community college students who transfer without having first completed an associate degree are less likely to get a bachelor’s degree than students who graduate from the community college first—56 percent versus 72 percent degree completion, respectively.

Sarah Hubbell, director of admissions, records and registration at Kalamazoo Valley Community College, said, Reverse Transfer can change that and help eliminate some of the risk for students in the process. “Students who receive their associate degree are more likely to finish their bachelor’s degree, increase their earning power, and improve their employment probabilities by showing competency and a dedication to finishing an educational milestone,” Hubbell said. Read more>

City Colleges’ Star Scholars Thrive in Second Year

Lawndale News, Nov. 3, 2016

The Chicago Star Scholarship program has successfully retained students with 86 percent of Star Scholars enrolled last fall returning to City Colleges for the fall 2016 term, suggesting that students enrolled in this program are highly likely to persist in their coursework toward a degree.

This rate is nearly double the national fall-to-fall retention rate for two-year public college students, according to the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center’s most recent report which found that just 48.5 percent of students return to the same institution within the same fall-to-fall semester time period. Read more>

Greeley-Evans School District 6 students participating in advanced programs, reaping the benefits

The Greeley Tribune, Oct. 28, 2016

Among AVID students who graduate high school, more than 90 percent completed four-year college requirements, are accepted into at least one four-year college or university or plan to pursue post-secondary education. Although data is limited on college persistence year-to-year, 76 percent of 2012 AVID graduates persisted to their second year of college, a number greater than the national average, according to National Student Clearinghouse. Read more>

Report Underscores Racial, Class Disparities in College Degree Attainment

Diverse Issues in Higher Education, Oct. 28, 2016

Despite the increased emphasis placed in recent years on the importance of obtaining a college degree, deep disparities between rich and poor, minority and White students still persist when it comes to who goes to college as well as who finishes, new college completion figures released Thursday show. Read more>

 

High School Poverty, Minority Enrollment, Undermine College Progress, Study Finds

Education Week, Oct. 28, 2016

Students who attend high-poverty schools or schools with high minority enrollments are far less likely to enroll in college, and less likely to complete degrees than their more advantaged peers, according to a new set of data released Thursday.

The fourth annual “High School Benchmarks” report from the National Student Clearinghouse offers numbers and charts for what most educators already know about how concentrations of disadvantage influence educational outcomes. Read more >

Big data on campus

IDG Connect, Oct. 17,2016

Purdue is one of dozens of institutions of higher-learning, from private colleges to large public universities, that are turning to data to improve their student retention and graduation rates. The national average six-year graduation rate for students attending four-year schools is about 54 percent, according to the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center. Poorly performing schools post percentages in the low 30s, and the average of higher-performing institutions is around 70 percent. At 51.5 percent, Purdue is in the middle of the pack. Read more >

High School Benchmarks 2016 Webinar, Oct. 27 at 2 PM Eastern

National Student Clearinghouse Blog, Oct. 18

The National Student Clearinghouse® Research Center™ will hold a webinar on Thursday, Oct. 27, at 2 p.m. Eastern to release the fourth annual High School Benchmarks Report: National College Progression Rates. The report provides new data on high school graduates’ college access, persistence, and completion outcomes. Register today to attend the webinar! Read more >

Pinning her hopes on higher ed debt plan

Post-Crescent (Wisconsin), Oct. 6, 2016

Kaela Lundeen’s path to higher education is the definition of nontraditional. At 17 years old, she left home for a better future and to escape a childhood riddled with trauma.

Her goal is to become a lawyer. Once she saves enough money, she will enroll at Fox Valley Technical College. Across Wisconsin, nearly a third of 2013-14 college graduates attended a two-year institution at some point during the previous decade, according to a 2015 study by the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center. Read more>

The term ‘nontraditional student’ is extinct

EducationDive, Oct. 3, 2016

Recent data from the National Center for Education Statistics outlines the growth of nontraditional learners on college campuses nationwide, eCampus News reports. According to the data, about 74% of all undergraduates enrolled during the 2011-12 academic year possessed at least one characteristic of a nontraditional student, denoted by part-time enrollment, working full-time, identifying as a single caregiver, not having a traditional high school diploma, or financial independence. Read more>

 

 

 

Competency-Based Hiring: 10 Signals The Shift Is Happening

Forbes, Oct. 1, 2016

Fifty-three percent of college graduates students believe they’re ready to apply their skills and knowledge in the workforce, but only 23% of employers agree. It is increasingly clear that misalignment between post-secondary education and workforce needs is suppressing economic productivity and growth, as systematic reliance on degrees as a skills-proxy, exacerbated by an epidemic of upcredentialing, prevents individuals and employers from achieving their potential. Read more>

It’s Time to View Industry Credentials Through the Lens of Student Success

The EvoLLLution, Sept. 28, 2016

Industry credentials are certainly not new, but colleges and universities are realizing that they may have a bigger role to play in preparing students to earn them than ever before. In this interview, Roberta Hyland discusses the value of industry credentials for today’s students and shares her thoughts on how the postsecondary space must evolve to better accommodate these unique credentials. Read more>

Digital Credentials Make Convenience Possible, But Not Without Reliability

The Evolllution, Sept. 27, 2016

Digital credentials have been gaining steam as the next big change in the credentialing space. After all, they overcome a number of the challenges people face with the traditional transcript and paper credential format. However, there are a number of obstacles to avoid in this space as well. In this interview, Rick Torres reflects on the capacity for digital credentials to shake up both the for-credit and non-credit credentialing space and shares his thoughts on some of the major roadblocks standing in the way of its wider adoption. Read more>

Microcredentials: Closing the Skills Gap and Adding Value to Passion

The Evolllution, Sept. 26, 2016

Microcredentials fill a critical void in the postsecondary space that helps to close the skills gap and provide individuals the competencies they need to enter and succeed in the labor market. Read more>

Shaken By Economic Change, ‘Non-Traditional’ Students Are Becoming The New Normal

NPR, Sept. 25, 2016

Almost half of all undergraduate students in higher education today can be categorized as “non-traditional.” At America’s community colleges, those students are the vast majority. The already large adult student population is projected to grown even larger in coming years. Read more>

It takes longer to finish college, but that’s not the story

Community College Daily, Sept. 19, 2016

Only 7 percent of associate-degree earners who attend community college full time complete their degree within two years. More than half finish within four or more years. Those figures — which come from a new report from the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center — may seem dire, but they illustrate an important fact for community college and other higher education advocates: how students attend college is changing but the metrics often used to measure student success are lagging behind. (Time-to-completion figures for public four-year institutions are similar.) Read more>

Clearinghouse Data on Time to Degree

Inside Higher Ed, Sept. 19, 2016

The National Student Clearinghouse Research Center today released a virtually comprehensive look at how long it took American college graduates in 2015 to earn their degrees. The new report is based on completion data for two million students who that year earned either an associate or bachelor’s degree. It includes information on students who previously dropped out or transferred, which many other data sets struggle to capture. Read more>

 

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